How confident are you in your decision-making skills? Which principles guide you most when choosing?

Part of the struggle that we have in making decisions is that we do not know much about ourselves. By taking time to explore our values, decision-making style, and optimal state for making choices, we will be much better at deciding with satisfaction.

Getting clarity about ourselves in these areas can make decisions easier:

1. Know your values. What is your vision for life? Have you put in the work to carefully articulate your value system? How can those decisions get you closer to what…


Throughout our lives, we will make our fair share of difficult decisions — what school to attend, career to pursue, whom to marry, where to live, how many children to have? And there will be infinitely more smaller daily decisions — what takeout to order, what to wear to an important event, which gym to attend, how much time should be spent on watching tv or reading and so on.

Indeed, our days can sometimes seem like they are filled with a constant stream of decisions. …


How you treat people matters more than anything. Companies should create a culture of respect, and every leader should have an obligation to uphold a no-jerk environment because it allows for great work to be done and it is simply the right thing to do.

The impact of a toxic worker is quite significant. Experts say, when a team member procrastinates or displays a bad attitude, there is a real risk of social contagion, which drives down the morale and productivity of those around them. Susan Davis, author of Emotional Agility contends, “we all pick up on settle cues from…


Steve Jobs has had a complicated legacy. While few would doubt his visionary abilities, many would call into question his leadership style and weak interpersonal skills. He has been described as deceitful and cruel, even by his friends. It is known that he cheated his co-founder out of a big bonus and lied about it. While Walter Isaacson was conducting research when writing the biography of Jobs, Apple Engineer Johnny Ives told Isaacson that when Jobs got frustrated, his way to achieve catharsis was to hurt someone. …


There is always that one person you work with whose job is to make everybody’s life just a little more difficult. They show nuanced passive-aggressiveness by hinting at what they dislike instead of having clear communication, they take credit for wins they have not contributed to, they dole out blame unfairly, they provide misleading or incomplete information to make your work more cumbersome than it has to be. They can also display their difficulty in more obvious ways — raising their voices, ridiculing, complaining, and showing an overall foul attitude. This person may behave this way either because they are…


Some of our best accomplishments come from our sheer belief in our ability to get the job done. But what happens when we do not believe in ourselves or blindly follow behavioral patterns which consistently hold us back? As a Leadership Coach, I work with people to remove common internal blocks, which could come in the form of pesky — Gremlins, Assumptions, Interpretations, and Limiting Beliefs.

The first step to breaking through these constraints we place on ourselves is raising awareness around their existence and labeling what is happening so we can shatter their power. …


We all experience feelings of insecurity, but when we suffer from imposter syndrome, or the belief that we do not deserve our accomplishments, our best energy is zapped. Yet, we do not have to remain a victim to those feelings; in fact, there are many ways we can healthily deal with this widespread affliction.

Here are some strategies for addressing imposter syndrome:

1. Raise your awareness. When we notice we are having these feelings, we want to write them down so we can explore further. How would I describe these feelings? When do they emerge? The more we are aware…


In the last article, we talked about what imposter syndrome is and some negative impacts on work and life. This article will focus on who experiences imposter syndrome, where it comes from, and how it may manifest so we can raise awareness on this issue and take action for positive changes.

Who Experiences Imposter Syndrome?

When the concept was first published in an academic paper in 1978 by Dr. Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes, it was described as a mental health issue, a sort of neurosis found in high achieving women from white middle-class backgrounds. The reason why it was initially thought to be…


You have just been told the fantastic news that you have been promoted to lead a team for the first time and while you thought you would have an immediate rush of euphoria, you pause to pay attention to your actual feeling, and notice that you have an overflow of doubt and negativity. Your mind spins a series of aggressive questions — what if I cannot do this? What if they find out that I am not that talented? …


We spend an inordinate amount of time being stressed at work. While some frustrations may be driven by the “do more with less” approach, the struggle to keep up with rapid changes, and a general avalanche of problems, one of our top sources of stress relates to the conflict we have with other people. The typical responses of complaining, avoiding, or fighting can be absolutely draining. Recent studies show that in the US, work-related stress is costing the economy over 300 billion per year and can be blamed for 120,000 deaths per year.

How we deal with stress related to…

Regina Zafonte

CEO and Founder at Next Levels Coaching Regina@nextlevelscoaching.com

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