Steve Jobs has had a complicated legacy. While few would doubt his visionary abilities, many would call into question his leadership style and weak interpersonal skills. He has been described as deceitful and cruel, even by his friends. It is known that he cheated his co-founder out of a big bonus and lied about it. While Walter Isaacson was conducting research when writing the biography of Jobs, Apple Engineer Johnny Ives told Isaacson that when Jobs got frustrated, his way to achieve catharsis was to hurt someone. …


There is always that one person you work with whose job is to make everybody’s life just a little more difficult. They show nuanced passive-aggressiveness by hinting at what they dislike instead of having clear communication, they take credit for wins they have not contributed to, they dole out blame unfairly, they provide misleading or incomplete information to make your work more cumbersome than it has to be. They can also display their difficulty in more obvious ways — raising their voices, ridiculing, complaining, and showing an overall foul attitude. This person may behave this way either because they are unaware of their actions or because they know exactly what they are doing and simply do not care or cannot control it. …


Some of our best accomplishments come from our sheer belief in our ability to get the job done. But what happens when we do not believe in ourselves or blindly follow behavioral patterns which consistently hold us back? As a Leadership Coach, I work with people to remove common internal blocks, which could come in the form of pesky GAILS — Gremlins, Assumptions, Interpretations, and Limiting Beliefs.

The first step to breaking through these constraints we place on ourselves is raising awareness around their existence and labeling what is happening so we can shatter their power. …


We all experience feelings of insecurity, but when we suffer from imposter syndrome, or the belief that we do not deserve our accomplishments, our best energy is zapped. Yet, we do not have to remain a victim to those feelings; in fact, there are many ways we can healthily deal with this widespread affliction.

Here are some strategies for addressing imposter syndrome:

1. Raise your awareness. When we notice we are having these feelings, we want to write them down so we can explore further. How would I describe these feelings? When do they emerge? The more we are aware of our anxieties, the smarter we can become about how they operate, and the easier it will be to either shrug them off next time they pop up, or have a planned approach to deal with them. …


In the last article, we talked about what imposter syndrome is and some negative impacts on work and life. This article will focus on who experiences imposter syndrome, where it comes from, and how it may manifest so we can raise awareness on this issue and take action for positive changes.

Who Experiences Imposter Syndrome?

When the concept was first published in an academic paper in 1978 by Dr. Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes, it was described as a mental health issue, a sort of neurosis found in high achieving women from white middle-class backgrounds. The reason why it was initially thought to be a unique woman challenge is because females were the ones who talked about it. …


You have just been told the fantastic news that you have been promoted to lead a team for the first time and while you thought you would have an immediate rush of euphoria, you pause to pay attention to your actual feeling, and notice that you have an overflow of doubt and negativity. Your mind spins a series of aggressive questions — what if I cannot do this? What if they find out that I am not that talented? …


We spend an inordinate amount of time being stressed at work. While some frustrations may be driven by the “do more with less” approach, the struggle to keep up with rapid changes, and a general avalanche of problems, one of our top sources of stress relates to the conflict we have with other people. The typical responses of complaining, avoiding, or fighting can be absolutely draining. Recent studies show that in the US, work-related stress is costing the economy over 300 billion per year and can be blamed for 120,000 deaths per year.

How we deal with stress related to coworkers can determine our health, happiness, and productivity. While it is tempting to blame the other person, there is usually not one culprit so an excellent place to start is understanding our role in the situation. …


When stress strikes and impacts your body and mind, how do you handle it? Learning about your reactions can help you manage it and build resilience in its presence.

Here are 3 leading ways to get to the root of stress:

1. Explore your stress through questioning. Ask yourself:

A. How do I respond under pressure? Maybe you confront, avoid, break down, become irrational.

B. What does stress do to me physically? Beating heart, tightness in your chest or shoulders, sweating, knots in your stomach, or headaches.

C. How does it affect me emotionally? Do I get sad, angry, worried, or have a pervasive out-of-control feeling? …


In the last article, we talked about different kinds of stress and associated positive and negative impacts. The focus of this article will be on ways to manage worry effectively.

Let’s Jump Into Leading Techniques to Deal with Stress:

1. View it positively. How you see it makes all the difference. A study tracked 30,000 adults in the US for eight years and began by asking people, “How much stress have you experienced in the last year?” and “Do you believe that stress is harmful to your health?” Researchers then used public death records to find out who died. The results showed that people who experienced a lot of stress in the previous year and viewed it as harmful to their health had a 43% increased risk of dying. People who experienced a lot of anxiety but did not see it as harmful were no more likely to die. In fact, they had the lowest risk of dying of anyone in the study, including people who had relatively little strain. …


There are no shortages of common sources of stress including work, children, finances, relationships, illness, overcommitment, loneliness, family dynamics, lack of work-life balance, and uncertainty, all exacerbated during these quarantine times. While stress is a ubiquitous part of life, its negative effects do not have to be. The very way we look at stress can completely change its hold over us.

Stress comes in many different forms. There is the type of stress which you bring onto yourself such as showing up for a meeting unprepared or skipping out on a commitment. This is pointless stress because it can be avoided or minimized with advance planning and prioritization before the situation turns problematic. There is the stress that hits you like a bolt from the blue and even having done everything right, you could not have anticipated or controlled its arrival. There is high-level stress that can be debilitating to your performance and there is low-level stress that can be enhancing. There is short-lived stress that provides the accelerating force for you to accomplish a task and there is long-lasting stress that chips away at your health and happiness each day. …

About

Regina Zafonte

CEO and Founder at Next Levels Coaching Regina@nextlevelscoaching.com

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